Program

Sessions

Agifall: Adopting the Right Agile Principles in Your PMO

Moving traditional project management processes away from waterfall and towards agile is complicated for large, established PMOs and organizations. Despite industry and corporate pressures, the leap to Agile may not make sense for your projects or organization.

The middle ground to unlocking the value of Agile for the traditional waterfall project is to create a hybrid project management process (or PMO) by adopting the right Agile Principles for your PMO. This adoption is the first and best step to delivering your project’s value faster and with less risk to the business.

This presentation will review waterfall and agile frameworks and terminology as a foundation to examine Crown Corporation, British Columbia Lottery Corporation’s (BCLC) Casino Loyalty Program as a case study on the agifall or hybrid project management process. Even though in an established waterfall environment, the Encore Loyalty project has leveraged incremental development, iterative delivery, scrum teams and integrated agile vendors with waterfall internal teams to deliver business value faster.

Agile Product Rescue

Desperate for help, a power transmission company in the U.S. reached out for assistance. Their software vendor (at the time) was charging exorbitant fees but delivering very little. Initially, the client engaged us to conduct an assessment. Our findings revealed positive and negative information. The good news was that a re-write of the application was not necessary. The bad news was that the application was riddled with technical debt.

Shortly after our findings were digested, the client engaged us to take over the application in its entirety. Based on our engagement with the client (i.e. people/organization/etc.) we felt that an Agile approach would be work well. Even though our team did not completely agree on Agile we decided to proceed with a Scrum approach. We explained this to the client and they agreed. They even dedicated one of their resources to be available for testing at all times. Various communication tools had to be implemented to accommodate a distributed development team as well a distributed client.

Additional tools were required to implement continuous integration as none of this was in place. An aggressive release plan was put together which spanned nine months. It was decided that each sprint would be two weeks in duration and would start with sprint planning. Each sprint would end with a sprint review immediately followed by a sprint retrospective. It was agreed that daily scrums would occur at 1:30 PM MST. Once the project commenced the team naturally gravitated to pair programming even though it had not been previously discussed.

Thus, the team met the anticipated velocity in the first 3 sprints. After the first 3 sprints the team noticeably got better and better. This was evident from the velocity they were achieving. In fact, the entire original release plan was completed in 6 months. The project could have ended at that point but the client was hungry for more as they had never experienced this kind of progress before. The next three months were spent replacing the user interface and adding quality to the system in the form of automated UI testing. At project completion, 1 FTE was retained for support and maintenance. At that point the product switched to a Kanban approach. Daily Scrums/Standups with the client were still held but the other Scrum ceremonies were disbanded.

Agility vs. Culture: Your Agile Koolaid May Be Someone Else’s Bitters! Let’s “Change” That

Many transformations to Agile have been reported as being unsuccessful or short-lived, yet an increasing number of organizations are attempting to adopt Agile principles into their everyday business. This interactive workshop will give you an in-depth understanding of cultural challenges that are present in organizations today and identify opportunities from a change perspective when adopting agility in order to achieve results. Leveraging Prosci’s Change concepts, best practices and client examples, we will examine how you can use the change management tools to anticipate and mitigate resistance in an agile transformation and make a positive and lasting impact within your organizational culture.

Sponsored by

Alberta vs. World: Containing Our Project Costs to Compete Globally

Today, Alberta Oil & Gas projects compete worldwide for investment capital. Energy companies and their suppliers are innovating to deliver cost efficient value. Investment in Alberta for Sustaining Capital projects now exceeds new Greenfield CAPEX projects in some sectors. Hence senior management is focused on improving the predictability and efficiency of their Sustaining Capital Program.

In May 2017, the 10th PMI EPC Roundtable met to consider this topic. A brainstorming session with of Owner companies, Engineering Consultants and Construction Contractors considered ideas such as:

  • Using standardized designs to reduce engineering and construction costs, while still staying current with technology advancements
  • Using unconventional contracting strategies to encourage collaboration between Owners and Contractors, and to reduce conflicts during execution.
  • Applying fit for purpose project delivery models that ensure project teams are focusing on the right deliverables

The results from this session are surprising. Together, the participants identified many practices we can adopt to improve outcomes for sustaining capital projects. But we must be willing to adapt to change and embrace new ways of working together!

 

Artificial Intelligence That Matches Reality to the Plan: A Disruptive Method to Manage Risk and Performance of a Capital Project

A typical capital project overruns budget by 30% and schedule by 17% because of mismatches between design, fabrication, logistics, and construction. Rework is a global problem and represents over $1 Trillion in waste. This happens on 90% of the projects. So this isn’t just a problem – it is an epidemic – and presents an enormous risk. VEERUM is an Industrial IoT firm incubated by GE, Cenovus, and R&D funds from the Canadian Federal and Provincial government. It uses sensors, software, and AI to match the physical reality to the plans.

BC Hydro “PMI 2016 PMO of the Year”: Achieving Award Winning Results

BC Hydro has a mandate to deliver approximately $2.0 billion CAD in annual capital for the next ten years to support BC’s economic growth and meet the demands of BC Hydro customers by refurbishing, replacing and building generation, transmission and distribution infrastructure. This consists of hundreds of projects ranging in value from over $8 billion CAD to under $1 million CAD, which need to be delivered on time and on budget. To meet this challenge, BC Hydro needs to work in a disciplined and systematic way to ensure projects are brought into service safely and to a high standard of quality; on time and on budget. In anticipation of this sustained high level of capital expenditure, BC Hydro formed its Project Management Office in 2007. Since 2007 the PMO has been on a journey developing and implementing a standardized and consistent approach to project management, supported by defined practices and leading technology. One of the highlights in this journey was recognition from the Project Management Institute as the 2016 PMO of the Year! In this session we will share our journey – where we started, the project delivery methodology that we have developed and implemented, what we have achieved, important ingredients to our success, lessons we have learned along the way and where we are headed next.

Billion Agile: Applying Scrum Values and Principles to Large Construction Projects

What started as an experiment four years ago has resulted in the successful application of agile values, principles, and techniques in a domain usually managed with traditional techniques. Prior to starting this work, multiple conversations with the Program sponsor revealed concerns with the team’s ability to focus on what’s important, resolve issues quickly, and keep commitments. Many of these issues appeared to be rooted in team dynamics and a siloed approach to delivering work product; consequently we decided to experiment with applying Scrum to an Engineering Procurement Construction (EPC) project.

For this large ($1B) EPC project, the three pillars of Scrum (Transparency, Inspection, and Adaptation) and the associated values of Scrum (Focus, Courage, Openness, Respect, and Commitment) were applied with great success. The Project team embarked on a journey using Scrum roles, artifacts, and events that emphasized the pillars and values of Scrum. The results culminated in the project being delivered within schedule and budget where 30% cost growth and 20% schedule slippage was considered the historical norm.

Subsequently, those same techniques and mindset were applied to a large ($3B) EPCM program of three natural gas processing plant construction projects. This program involved an owner in an oversight role working side-by-side with the EPCM. This resulted in the need to address cultural and business process differences between multiple organizations. The results are leading to a 5-15% decrease in cost and schedule in an environment where 30% cost growth and 20% schedule slippage was considered the historical norm.

Business Relationship Management Introduction

The intent is to introduce attendees to the BRMIBoK, which defines the core competencies required to be effective in managing relationships with our business partners to ensure optimization of value delivery from the provider domain, as well as the various activities required to establish and manage those relationships. As per the body of knowledge, BRM is both a role and a discipline. PMP’s are typically performing in roles with significant relationship management focus.

Having a base knowledge of this growing area of focus would significantly complement their existing skill sets. The BRMIBoK is a well-established and evolving body of knowledge. This presentation will provide an overview of the BRMIBoK, the importance and value of the BOK, and many of the key artifacts.

Can’t Be in Two Places at Once? Let us Show You How!

Violate the laws of physics! Be in two or more places at once with effective use of remote awareness technology to manage your projects. Get up-to-date information on remote construction sites. Record the actual progress of activities in a time-lapse video. Identify unwanted visitors to your remote site and more. Come listen to a case study on the on-going rehabilitation of remote construction sites and how technology helped the project manager be in several places at once.

CEO Open Mic

Back by popular demand, the CEO Open Mic will return for a 2nd Annual panel discussion! The panel will offer local business leaders with the opportunity to reflect on major milestones in their career, and discuss memorable experiences that have guided them to learn, develop and prepare for their current role.

Stay tuned in the Fall when we reveal our CEOs! You won’t want to miss this!

Cracking the Code on your Communication by Mastering your Psychology (Part I)

**This in-depth session consists of two parts and is held over the course of two hours.**


You probably already know that effective communication has always been influenced by interpretation and assumptions – on both sides of the conversation. Imagine if you had the power to ethically influence people’s subconscious minds for better receptivity and imagine if you could do it by using simple trigger words (or even non verbal’s) to activate involuntary “reflexes” in the brain.

Now imagine you could do it in writing as well as in speech. You probably don’t believe this can actually happen. But Faith is going to tell you that it can—because over time we’ve all been subtly hypnotized to accept these triggers and they are impacting our conversations (on and offline) each and every day.

In a business where you are judged heavily on your talent for communicating, it pays to master the psychology that affects both the spoken and written word – does it not?! If you want to get better at influential leadership, reduce conflicts and embrace change, then don’t miss the session that will show you how to master the psychology.

Cracking the Code on your Communication by Mastering your Psychology (Part II)

**This in-depth session consists of two parts and is held over the course of two hours.**


You probably already know that effective communication has always been influenced by interpretation and assumptions – on both sides of the conversation. Imagine if you had the power to ethically influence people’s subconscious minds for better receptivity and imagine if you could do it by using simple trigger words (or even non verbal’s) to activate involuntary “reflexes” in the brain.

Now imagine you could do it in writing as well as in speech. You probably don’t believe this can actually happen. But Faith is going to tell you that it can—because over time we’ve all been subtly hypnotized to accept these triggers and they are impacting our conversations (on and offline) each and every day.

In a business where you are judged heavily on your talent for communicating, it pays to master the psychology that affects both the spoken and written word – does it not?! If you want to get better at influential leadership, reduce conflicts and embrace change, then don’t miss the session that will show you how to master the psychology.

Data Analytics for Project Managers: Moving Beyond Excel

Data analysis skills are key for project managers to provide effective insights to their stakeholders and sponsors. When it comes to trying to report and analyze project or program performance, better understand team velocity, estimate costs, or to provide other project metrics, most project managers resort to building complex spreadsheets.

In this presentation, discover how recent advancements being made with tools such as Microsoft® Power BI make it faster and easier for project managers to perform complex data analysis and provide critical project metrics. Presented through a combination of sharing data analysis practices and relevant examples, this lecture explores techniques to combine and structure data

Dealing with People Issues: Situational Leadership

It’s never the technical project management that derails a project – it is always the people. As a project manager, you have to be on the top of your game to manage your resources, but it isn’t always easy. Understanding Situational Leadership will give a project manager the skills to deal with different types of people, in different situations, and get results. Master your people skills and elevate your leadership capability!

Design Thinking: Shaping the Future with People in Mind

In today’s challenging economy, innovation is as essential as it is difficult. Cultures capable of “inventing the future” are rare, but the emerging discipline of design thinking – honed by the celebrated innovation consultancy IDEO – provides people with the tools and techniques to think differently, see new opportunities, and create innovative solutions with impact. Discover “How might we…?” through this human-centred approach to innovation to drive initiatives that meet human need, add business value and are technically feasible. Walk through this problem solving approach and learn how it was applied to design a corporate strategic planning system for the City of Calgary.

Forecasting Techniques and IT Project Initiation at Mount Royal University

Continuing on a theme of transformation introduced at PMI-SAC 2016, this presentation focuses on a more technical topic, that of forecasting and project selection. How does Mount Royal University (MRU) determine which IT initiatives to invest in that support growth and transformation while at the same time improve efficiency in running daily operations, all in a time of fiscal uncertainty in a battered economy like Alberta’s? What impact will the provincial election of 2019 and the subsequent fiscal direction have on higher education operating grants? Will the fundamental nature of how support functions like IT change?What do students in 2019-2022 require and expect from front-line facing functions such as teaching, support and enrolment and what are the corresponding demands placed on IT? Finally, what skills must IT invest in now to meet the changing demands of the university in three years?

As project management practitioners, the questions surrounding initiation, definition and planning of your projects will be different but still exist in a reality of uncertainty no different than MRU. Walk through various forecasting techniques and tools in an attempt to identify options and make the best decisions possible.

Higher Ed PMO: Value Delivery in a Revenue-Free Environment (Part I)

**This in-depth session consists of two parts and is held over the course of two hours.**


The Project Management Office is a well established strategic vehicle in the private sector. Organizations are able to reduce costs, increase revenue, and drive strategy using project and portfolio management and PMO best practices. In the tightly cost-constrained and resource-limited world of Higher Education, particularly in the current climate of wage freezes, resource reductions, and cost cutting, the business case for the PMO is tougher to make.

In 2015 the University of Lethbridge re-launched their IT PMO not really knowing what to expect. Within 18 months the service offering has grown 500%, and project delivery capacity in the PMO’s first year of operations exceed the previous 4 years combined. This powerful business case is one other institutions in Canada are taking notice of, and is becoming a pilot site for rapid-deployment, pragmatic project and portfolio management with strong PMO governance.

This session will describe the University’s journey from value and needs assessment, through PMO vision-setting and strategic planning, to the end of the first 18 months of execution and value delivery. The presentation will come complete with a suite of freely distributed turnkey PMO and Project Management toolkit for organizations to use to “bootstrap” themselves up the PMO maturity curve rapidly and pragmatically. The presentation will leave you with the what, why, and how of making a PMO a viable, strategic, and value-generating aspect of your organization, complete with the tools to start down the path at work the next day.

Higher Ed PMO: Value Delivery in a Revenue-Free Environment (Part II)

**This in-depth session consists of two parts and is held over the course of two hours.**


The Project Management Office is a well established strategic vehicle in the private sector. Organizations are able to reduce costs, increase revenue, and drive strategy using project and portfolio management and PMO best practices. In the tightly cost-constrained and resource-limited world of Higher Education, particularly in the current climate of wage freezes, resource reductions, and cost cutting, the business case for the PMO is tougher to make.

In 2015 the University of Lethbridge re-launched their IT PMO not really knowing what to expect. Within 18 months the service offering has grown 500%, and project delivery capacity in the PMO’s first year of operations exceed the previous 4 years combined. This powerful business case is one other institutions in Canada are taking notice of, and is becoming a pilot site for rapid-deployment, pragmatic project and portfolio management with strong PMO governance.

This session will describe the University’s journey from value and needs assessment, through PMO vision-setting and strategic planning, to the end of the first 18 months of execution and value delivery. The presentation will come complete with a suite of freely distributed turnkey PMO and Project Management toolkit for organizations to use to “bootstrap” themselves up the PMO maturity curve rapidly and pragmatically. The presentation will leave you with the what, why, and how of making a PMO a viable, strategic, and value-generating aspect of your organization, complete with the tools to start down the path at work the next day.

How Networking Helps You, the Project Manager, Get the Next Amazing Project and Set it up for Success

Do you struggle with networking? Do you struggle with project start up? Would it be great to have some tools that could help both situations? We have been told again and again networking is vital for our careers, as an employee or a consultant. That we should invest in it at regular intervals. And the reality is sometimes performance during the last project isn’t enough to secure the next one.

A seasoned and self-managing project professional uses networking to not only get the next great gig but to reduce the ‘storming and norming’ situation of a project start up with your stakeholders. You must admit, it would be a big win if your next project start-up could be smoother. Tanya Stevenson and Myke Macapinlac advocate that networking is a vital ingredient to help you attain choices of projects and secure your choice. And, here’s a new twist – effective networking aligned with your personal brand also supports your ability to plan and engage your project stakeholders successfully.

How to Run a High-Quality Project

Can you observe a project in progress and recognize high quality? In the case of project-led initiatives based on PRINCE2® and PMBOK®, the focus is on quality assurance and quality control. Or if quality is a corporate initiative, the process baseline might be ISO9000, TQM, or Six Sigma.

Unfortunately, the treatment of quality as an ‘added extra’ has established the myth that quality can be sprinkled onto the project. Also, after the first burst of enthusiasm, many corporate quality initiatives have lost vitality, leaving projects stranded. This has diluted ownership of project quality and damaged the PM’s leadership role.

In this interactive presentation, you will explore this philosophy with a new approach that re-examines the fundamentals of a project, and based on the project model that has been developed I ask, “how is quality recognized as an intrinsic part of each fundamental component?”

How to Survive Cloud Implementations and Be Successful

The adoption of cloud solutions by businesses has gone mainstream. Companies often choose several different solutions to address various business problems. At the conception stage, such projects often seem straightforward and unlikely to present major challenges, since many of the traditional activities like hardware and software management are now integrated into the cloud solution. However, this is a misguided perception.

What is not being considered are the new integration issues that arise when an organization adopts a cloud strategy. The challenges are multi-faceted since they are on the business process level, organizational level, and technological level. The latter in particular provides challenges in respect to security issues, transformation, and data delivery issues.

Therefore, the implementation of cloud solutions requires a vertical project planning assessment which is concerned with resolving the issues between business process design and management and the underlying technologies. It also requires a horizontal perspective that addresses on one level the issues arising from newly designed business processes and the transformation processes that will guide the organization into the new paradigm.

On the second level are technological issues such as security and network issues, landscape management between cloud environments and on-premise applications, and last but not least, the topic of data integrity. Data integrity does not only entail a proper data exchange between cloud and on-premise applications but also data availability in ensuring that cloud data is properly secured through backup and recovery processes.

A prerequisite for a successful project delivery in these environments is that the project manager is not only aware of these issues but also demonstrates a reasonable understanding of their interrelationship and how this could affect project timeline, budget, and quality of delivery.

Inside the Business of Projects: Tips from the Professionals

To be competitive, projects must be planned and delivered with professional attention to cost management and customer satisfaction. This applies to vendors who take on contracts for a fixed price, but increasingly to internal providers. Global and project management under such circumstances concentrates on a project portfolio approach that addresses business issues and requires frameworks, methods, and techniques beyond standard PMBOK. This is the theme of Commercial Project Management, published by Routledge in June 2017, and the inspiration for this session.

Three models are presented as offering a structure for disciplined, consistent, and unambiguous communication between customer, vendor and project team:

  • The Commercial Project Environment
  • The Four Functions of Project Management
  • The Shared Project Lifecycle

Over years of experience in this environment, Robin has determined six core practices that demand special attention from PMs, and extend existing methods and techniques. These are:

  1. Lifecycle Mapping – team integration and communication
  2. Accountabilities Definition – roles and responsibilities for mixed teams
  3. Risk Management – a total system applied to both projects and business
  4. Estimating – an estimating practice, a compatible culture, and proper accountabilities
  5. Quality Management – business principles, an inexpensive QMS, and models for quality
  6. Resource Management – key metrics, reports, and techniques

Using these practices as a framework, Robin will offer a snapshot of key tips based on many years of observations.

Is Shadow-boxing with Shadow IT Undermining Your Peak Performance?

Shadow IT can be the source of tremendous, game-changing innovation or the source of expensive, distracting disruptions to smooth business operations. Shadow IT projects typically challenge the value of well-established best practices for project management and software development. Nonetheless, when project managers skillfully lead shadow IT initiatives, that leadership makes the difference between delivering useful business value or an expensive, value-destroying fiasco.

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Pressure is a Privilege

Every person plays a unique role and has different skills that contribute to a team’s success or failure. As a member of Team Canada’s Women’s Hockey Team for 23 years, Wickenheiser shares her Olympic journey, her thoughts on dealing with high pressure situations, team environments, and achieving success regardless of the circumstances. Whether it’s preparing for an Olympic Games or leading a major project, the path to a successful outcome is more similar than you might think.

Leadership Styles of Project and Construction Managers in the Canadian Oilsands

The Canadian Oilsands industry is a significant economic driver for Canada, with construction in the Canadian Oilsands accounting for more than 30% of all construction and employing more than 400,000 Canadians in 2014. The key to success in any endeavour is the quality of its leadership. The Canadian Oilsands are no exception and the aim of this study is to investigate the predominant leadership styles of project and construction managers. 100 project and construction managers from within the Oilsands were surveyed to obtain data on their prevalent leadership styles.

The dominant leadership style of a Canadian Oilsands project and construction manager is an autocratic approach. The leadership style of project and construction managers of other nations were analysed in comparison and it was determined that internationally there is a divide between transformational and situational leadership, contrasting greatly with the Oilsands. Additionally, leadership characteristics, attributes and qualities of Oilsands project and construction managers was surveyed. The most important effect that Oilsands respondents said a leader can have on worker performance is inspiration.

Communication skills, reliability and the ability to meet project objectives were also determined by respondents as keys to leader success. The study further examined the challenges of and opportunities for leadership development. Respondents remarked that currently an ineffective organizational culture is the greatest challenge to Oilsands leader development. Furthermore, education and training were noted as the prime areas required for leader development.

Finally, there exists an underlying tone from respondents of a hypocrisy of leadership, whereby those surveyed choose to lead using autocratic leadership while expressing their own desire to be led by a servant or transformational leader.

Managing Your ERP System Integrator

Implementing an ERP is tough work. The projects are big, messy, and complex and can easily overwhelm a company not experienced with these large transformational projects. Consequently, many businesses approach one of the large consulting firms or system integrators for assistance. Seeing the tools, methodologies, glamorous marketing materials and hordes of specialists at their disposal, many businesses entrust these large initiatives to one of these large consulting firms. Despite well-documented and high-profile project disasters, many businesses go forward believing – or rather hoping – that their project will be smooth sailing. Many of those projects do go relatively smoothly but some don’t and others you read about as case studies of “what not to do”.

Managing an ERP implementation project can be daunting. It demands focused upward management of the executive sponsor and steering committee. It demands precise planning, tracking and resourcing downwards in the team. It demands coordinated change management throughout the various layers of the organization. And it demands strong management of the very firm you brought in to implement and manage the project.

Providing Online and Real Time Project Reporting with Power BI (Part I)

**This in-depth session consists of two parts and is held over the course of two hours.**


In this session you will learn how to connect different sources of data to produce the reports that your project stakeholders needs to understand project status and financials. Use Microsoft Power BI to connect to databases, MS Project Server or Project Online, Excel Spreadsheets or CSV files and combine all the data in reports. Learn the different ways to use Power BI: As a desktop application, Excel Add On, Mobile App and embedded in your SharePoint site or website.

Providing Online and Real Time Project Reporting with Power BI (Part II)

**This in-depth session consists of two parts and is held over the course of two hours.**


In this session you will learn how to connect different sources of data to produce the reports that your project stakeholders needs to understand project status and financials. Use Microsoft Power BI to connect to databases, MS Project Server or Project Online, Excel Spreadsheets or CSV files and combine all the data in reports. Learn the different ways to use Power BI: As a desktop application, Excel Add On, Mobile App and embedded in your SharePoint site or website.

Scaling Agile at FCC

The whole is greater than the sum of the parts. STOP focusing on the silos. START focusing on the enterprise wide view. Organizations are undergoing evolutionary change and we need to observe the importance of incorporating people’s culture along the Agile journey. Many organizations have seen success with one or a few Scrum teams. The next logical step is to scale this throughout the organization. While it can be tempting to try the copy & paste approach and cross your fingers, there are many things you need to consider.

Farm Credit Canada is two and a half years into their Agile transformation. There have been many bumps along the road but there have been many successes. It all started with a single successful Scrum project. From there, an Agile bottom-up adoption began in the IT department followed by an IT re-organization. New roles such as Product Owners and Product Managers emerged and were highly sought after. The role of the Project Manager was the most affected. Project Managers had to adapt and transform the way they managed their work.

Approximately a year later, senior executives began to support the agile cause with a top down approach. The Executive Management Team adjusted their strategic governance approach to align to enterprise Agile. Today, FCC has adopted various Agile scaling techniques but they’ve also invented their own. For instance, ATC (Air Traffic Control) is a large board that depicts the progress of various value streams. Value streams can be in the hangar, runway, ready for liftoff, in the airspace, or preparing for landing. FCC is in the early stages of leveraging their Jira investment. A Project Portfolio Management plugin called Big Picture was recently added which will allow FCC to view the relationships between all of their value streams.

Throughout this multi-year endeavour FCC has faced many challenges and there are some that still linger and we continue to address them. What does this mean for the future of Agile at FCC? Where will our Agile journey take us in the years to come? We don’t really know and that’s okay. We’ll continue to inspect and adapt as we go keeping in mind that our customer experience is our top priority.

Secret Weapon to Increase Implementation Success: Organizational Change Management

Gain an indepth understanding of how Organizational Change Management (OCM) can maximize the critical success factors (on time, on budget and scope) of your projects.  Learn and understand the tactical components to managing change on a project while reviewing key misconceptions and pitfalls.  Gain insights through lessons learned in implementations, and obtain tools that will enable you to position yourself, your team and organization for greater adoption and engagement.

 

Send Lawyers, Guns and Money: Communicating Effectively on a Project Team

This presentation in three parts

  1. Them: the global
  2. You: the specific
  3. …and five things we should never talk about in our business
  • Starting your from the wrong end…
  • Your idea! Your vision! Your great contribution!…It ain’t about you
  • When you’re short on ears, and long on mouth.”
  • Two critical things to know about the people you’re communicating with…What do they want? What are they afraid of?
  • People ain’t snowflakes…
  • Always ask ‘why’? Why is he doing what he’s doing? ‘Because he’s an idiot’…is probably not the correct answer
  • Don’t understand why? You just haven’t figured it out yet…
  • “If you have an important point to make, don’t try to be subtle or clever. Use a pile driver. Hit the point once. Then come back and hit it again. Then hit it a third time – a tremendous whack.” Winston Churchill
  • But he’s not listening! So whose fault is that?

Seven Major Problems with Risk Management in EPC Projects

All risk programs will have some problems, if not by human nature then Murphy’s Law.  The purpose of this presentation is to highlight what, according to David, are the seven top problems he has found within risk management programs.  David believes there are very few risk programs that do not have at least one of them.  Once the problems have been identified, David will discuss what knowledge areas can be used to address them and the benefits to your organization of doing so.  As part of this, David will introduce a QAQC program specifically for project risk management programs that can be used to address several the problems as well as answer “How do you know our risk program is working?” Or “Is it improving?”

The objective is for audience to leave this presentation with knowledge of, or at least an awareness of, can see the value of being conscious of these problems, and provide to your organization ideas to help ensure these seven major risk problems are addressed.

Social Network Analysis for Agile Leaders: An Introduction

Increasingly business results are positively correlated with organizational agility. A key factor in achieving this agility is an organization’s change capability. The ability to prepare for and to manage change requires a degree of competence in change management, risk and resistance management, stakeholder management, communication, collaboration, project management, and leadership. This is a heavy burden that is increasingly being placed on business leaders and project managers. This presentation explores how social network analysis (SNA) can help relieve this burden and provide leaders and project managers with an empirical way of understanding the social and communicational patterns that impede or accelerate organizational agility and project success. Most importantly social network analysis can provide a map that can help teams navigate through the complexity of “culture” and assist in managing stakeholders, project communication, risk, and designing effective change strategies for teams, projects and programs.

The goal of this presentation is to provide leaders and project management professionals with an overview of social network analysis, it’s significance to understanding organizational agility, and how it can help managing in teams, projects and organizational change.

Technical Project Management Session

Session description coming soon…

The Agenda Your Business SuperPower (Part I)

**This in-depth session consists of two parts and is held over the course of two hours.**


Are you sick and tired of time-wasting, accomplish nothing meetings?

Do you get to the end of your work day only to realize it’s not over?

Can’t achieve your goals and objectives even though you’re working hard?

Meetings are an untapped opportunity, filled with unlimited potential to transform your results.

Most people think of the Agenda as just a piece of paper, if they even think about it at all!

What if the Agenda when used strategically could have you achieving your goal in every meeting?

Session Learning Objectives

  • Five key agenda components
  • How to create a winning client meeting
  • The agenda as the key to build trust and elevate credibility
  • Maximize your impact and influence in every meeting
  • Increase the accountability of others in your meetings to their commitments
  • How to tap into the underground decision-making process

The Agenda Your Business SuperPower (Part II)

**This in-depth session consists of two parts and is held over the course of two hours.**


Are you sick and tired of time-wasting, accomplish nothing meetings?

Do you get to the end of your work day only to realize it’s not over?

Can’t achieve your goals and objectives even though you’re working hard?

Meetings are an untapped opportunity, filled with unlimited potential to transform your results.

Most people think of the Agenda as just a piece of paper, if they even think about it at all!

What if the Agenda when used strategically could have you achieving your goal in every meeting?

Session Learning Objectives

  • Five key agenda components
  • How to create a winning client meeting
  • The agenda as the key to build trust and elevate credibility
  • Maximize your impact and influence in every meeting
  • Increase the accountability of others in your meetings to their commitments
  • How to tap into the underground decision-making process

The Coach Approach to Leading Teams

Project Managers can sometimes be supervisors, but most of the time must lead by influencing others without direct authority. Having a coaching skill set is critical to leading successfully. This presentation will offer a combination of both coaching theory and application by providing an opportunity to practice that theory within the session. The aim is for participants to be able to apply a coach approach with their project teams to enhance their leadership practices and integrate this into their daily work.

The Key Attributes of Effective Leaders: Project Delivery through Influence not Authority

With 25+ years of project management experience, Wayne Rambow has come to understand that leaders are not born, they are developed. Leadership, according to Warren Bennis, is the capacity to translate vision into reality. How do we accomplish this when people are intrinsically resistant to change? Only through the skilled application of a suite of soft-skills are we ableto convince people to do things they do not want to do to ultimately achieve what they want to achieve. This is more art than science. It takes imagination and courage to lead complex programs. In this session, we will explore some essential soft-skills to lead complex initiatives and the opportunities presented to us every day to develop these skills. Effective project managers know that it isn’t what we are managing but how we lead that will ultimately achieve the results we seek.

Three Simple Things You Can Do To Reach Your Project Milestones

In this turbulent economy business strategy and business management are not aligned as they could be in most organizations and, as a result, project managers are faced with increased pressure to achieve project milestones and business results under extremely tight deadlines.

In this session the audience members will learn three things:

  1. How to utilize an “Agile Value Strategy” framework to help you reach your project milestones
  2. How to apply the “B.U.I.L.D. communication model” to better engage with organizational stakeholders so that your ideas are not only heard, but are acted upon
  3. Learn about a “Governance Structure” that will help you identify practical ways to align external factors with internal capabilities to ensure your project milestone timeline efforts are sustainable, and work towards achieving your business results

 

Through the Ages: An Ancient Philosophy for Today’s Toughest Project Environment

Today’s projects are excessively complex. Project managers face a web of interconnected systems, continuous information updates, and political minefields that threaten their success. It’s a marvel that any project (and project manager) finishes successfully. One ancient philosophy is once again rising in popularity to help navigate complexities and make decisions under duress while not compromising a person’s integrity or code of ethics. These practices are being used in business, professional sports franchises, and, now, project management.

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Work Ethic and Your Project Team

What is work ethic? How do you define it? How do you measure it? How does it contribute to the success, or failure, of your project team and by extension, your project? Where has it gone, or has it really left? Do we really understand what work ethic is in today’s ever changing society? Work ethic takes on a different meaning to almost anyone ask to define it and yet we all know what it is. So why is it that we have a different expectation of each others work ethic? Why is there such a gap in understanding between ages and generations? Can setting expectations and leading by an example change a teams dynamic and work ethic?

Over my years as a project manager and project engineer, I have had the opportunity to experience many variations of work ethic. In my military career, I experienced what I perceive as a different kind of work ethic and yet another as a competitive athlete. Could there be this many kinds of work ethic? Or a better question may be, could there be more? Exploring work ethic and people’s perception of what work ethic means, is the first step in understanding how this seeming intangible, yet highly tangible trait contributes and detracts from your project. Harnessing the ability to recognize the subtle difference and those not so subtle differences can help make your project team go from zero to hero in a short period of time. Focusing different types of work ethic on specific tasks can make a mundane task for some turn into the most exciting work for others. Conveying and celebrating your teams differing work ethics to the team will help them preform. And yes, we will also discuss the elephant, which is seemingly in every room these days, the generational differences.

Through personal experience and active ongoing survey data, I will explore and present the information collected over my time in the military, the professional civilian work environment, and as an athlete to help my peers understand what I have learned about work ethic and how the changing face of the work force and our industry affects this unique trait.